Basic Guidelines on Giving and Receiving Critique

Basic Guidelines on Critiquing:

Critiques are not editing. Don’t focus on missing words or grammar issues unless they are so obvious they interrupt your reading.

Preferably, critiques will include reader feedback such as:
Likes: the reader’s favorite thing about the chapter or what interested them the most
Characters: a statement about the characters in the chapter (if it is a new character, what did the reader think about the person’s personality/actions; if it is a character from a previous chapter, were the actions believable/consistent/developing)
Setting: was there enough/too much, was it understandable/clear/vivid
Plot: did the story move forward/was it paced well
Dialogue: did it make sense/did it develop a character or move the plot
Description: did they match the tone of the story/help tell the story
Hook: was there something that makes you want to start the next chapter
Repeating little errors: was there a repeat common error that interfered with the flow of reading
 
Guidelines on Receiving Critiques:

Ask for clarification if there is a comment you don’t understand
Don’t defend the writing. No matter how negative the critique is, don’t say it isn’t right or try to explain what the writing meant. 
Writers are not required to follow the critique advice. It’s not wrong to ignore bad advice. It is just feedback from one specific reader. 
If critiques are done in person, it is important to note that groups can fixate on small issues that enjoyment readers will ignore.



http://www.writeaboutdragons.com/brandon_w2012/2013-lecture-1-2/goal-writing-group-rules-of-thumb/
*There is about a 2 minute portion where the sound cuts out, it restarts again and I think the information after the silence is important so I thought you should know it ends.

*Note – Louise originally posted this in a page. I moved it to a post to make it easier to find in search and navigation during some reorganization of the blog.

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  1. How to improve your own writing – Critiquing | Second Chapter Writing

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